Diya Gupta

Writer. Reseacher.


Date of Publication: Wednesday, 22nd November, 2017
Read the article on

“Teachers and students produce, reinforce, recreate, resist, and transform ideas about race, gender, and difference in the classroom.” - Chandra Talpade Mohanty, ‘On Race and Voice: Challenges for ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 10th November, 2017
Read the article on

  During the Allied invasion of Italy in early September 1943, an Indian lieutenant wrote a letter to his beloved. ...Read More


Date of Publication: Wednesday, 16th August, 2017
Read the article on

Christopher Nolan’s recent war film ‘Dunkirk’ has elicited a spectrum of responses. Reviewers hailed it as “spare, stunning, extraordinarily ambitious”, ...Read More


Date of Publication: Monday, 8th May, 2017
Read the article on

This photograph of an Indian soldier on board a troop ship to Singapore in 1941 confronts us with a familiar gesture from the Imperial War Museums archives. The soldier thrusts his head and arm through the ship’s porthole, and appropriates Churchill’s ...Read More


Date of Publication: Thursday, 23rd February, 2017
Read the article on

“Sicily is a very fertile country. It is the Kashmir of Europe.”- Letter in Malayalam by an Indian sepoy, August 1943, Central Mediterranean Forces. Through letters exchanged between the home front and international battlefronts, Indian soldiers in the Second World War reveal themselves to be ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 17th February, 2017
Read the article on

Organising an external speaker series at King’s College London descended on me rather serendipitously. I was setting up a reading group for postcolonial theory at the time (which, in the end, never quite took off), and mentioned that having academics talk occasionally at these sessions would create variety and stimulate ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 17th February, 2017
Read the article on

“I have written to you many times but God alone knows why I don’t get your letters. You say you write regularly. Letters ...Read More


Date of Publication: Tuesday, 24th January, 2017
Read the article on

Extracts from letters archived at the British Library, exchanged between the Indian home front and international battlefronts during the Second World War, become textual connectors linking the farthest corners of the Empire and imperial strongholds requiring defence against the Axis alliance.  Such letters map the ...Read More


Date of Publication: Tuesday, 20th December, 2016
Read the article on

“I have written to you many times but God alone knows why I don’t get your letters.  You say you write regularly.  Letters mean half meetings and they are a great consolation to us.” - Written in Urdu by an Indian sepoy from Tunisia on 16 May 1943.   ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 9th September, 2016
Read the article on

  Writing, that eternal procrastination. What could possibly get in the way of hammering out a thousand words on a PhD chapter? Emails, of course. And if you’re working from home, the washing up must be done before ...Read More


Date of Publication: Tuesday, 26th July, 2016
Read the article on

“Choti yeh hai teri saanp ki hi lehar Dogana/Khati hun tere vaste main zahar Dogana(This plait of yours is the wave of a serpent, Dogana/I take poison because of you, Dogana)” - Lines from nineteenth-century Urdu Rekhti poet Insha Allah Khan ...Read More


Date of Publication: Monday, 7th December, 2015
Read the article on

The moon’s great orb was resplendent in the quiet and dark night sky. Its gossamer sheen draped the square courtyard where the children played noisily and happily during the day. You could see the mountains in the distance, dark in the shadows, unrevealing of crevice, cranny or perilous drop; and glimmeringly silver ...Read More


Date of Publication: Tuesday, 3rd November, 2015
Read the article on

"The best moments... are when you come across something – a thought, a feeling, a way of looking at things – that you'd thought special, particular to you. And here it is, set down by someone else, a person you've never met, maybe even someone long dead. ...Read More


Date of Publication: Sunday, 5th April, 2015
View the article as PDF
Read the article on

"The best moments... are when you come across something - a thought, a feeling, a way of looking at things - that you'd thought special, particular to you. And here it is, set down by someone else, a person you've never met, maybe even someone long dead. And it's as if a hand has come out and taken yours." - ...Read More


Date of Publication: Sunday, 26th October, 2014
View the article as PDF
Read the article on

Diya Gupta was born and raised in Calcutta, and lived in the city for 21 years. She studied at Modern High School for Girls and Lady Brabourne College, and read for a BA and an MA in English from Jadavpur University before being offered a place at Cambridge University. She then worked in academic publishing. ...Read More


Date of Publication: Monday, 22nd September, 2014
View the article as PDF
Read the article on

At one point in her life, Tenzin Angmo must have felt that her options were shrinking rapidly. She was 18 years old, in Class 12, studying science and hoping to eventually become a doctor. But her father died unexpectedly, and she could not clear the medical entrance examinations. It was a setback – one that could have ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 30th September, 2011
Read the article on

“Dum” literally means “taking in air” in Hindi. Dum cooking entered India by way of Persia some 200 years ago, brought into the country by Muslim settlers. This culinary style allows for meat, coated with fresh spices and herbs, to slow cook in its own juices, retaining moisture and losing none of ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 29th July, 2011
Read the article on

An activist with a penchant for comic writing; projects for television; cinematic adaptations of famous novels; enigmatic royalty statements from publishers. For a small literary agency in London, this is all part of a day's work. But could it be right for you? And how would you know until you tried? Publishing ...Read More


Date of Publication: Tuesday, 19th July, 2011
View the article as PDF
Read the article on

I attended my first demonstration at the grand old age of 30. It was very civilised. We stood under umbrellas outside the Senate House in Cambridge University in the rain, and maintained silence. This marked our protest against the precipitous rise in UK student tuition fees for universities, tripled from 2012 onwards for ...Read More


Date of Publication: Wednesday, 29th June, 2011
Read the article on

Madhumita Banerjee is the new head-teacher of a government-run school in Banipur, West Bengal, close to India's border with Bangladesh. Being a teacher and educator for 30 years has not been enough to prepare her for this schooling experience in rural Bengal. "I have never witnessed poverty at such close quarters," she ...Read More


Date of Publication: Monday, 15th November, 2010
View the article as PDF
Read the article on

For most residents, Castle Hill is just an especially uphill cycle ride in Cambridge, occasionally tempered with a visit to the Castle pub or perhaps to the Maharajah curry house. But many hundreds of years ago, Castle Hill formed the city centre of Cambridge, part of the upper town where settlements were ...Read More


Date of Publication: Monday, 15th March, 2010
View the article as PDF
Read the article on

“There were 424 air raid alerts at Cambridge during the war, during which the enemy dropped 118 high-explosive bombs, 3 oil bombs and about 1000 incendiaries, and 29 people were killed. The Round Church, the Union Society and houses in Jesus Lane were hit in July 1942.” Jesus College’s 41st Annual Report, published ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 29th August, 2003
Read the article on

Kunal Basu’s second novel, The Miniaturist, blends history and fiction to recreate the world of 16th century India through the story of Bihzad, the illiterate yet exceptionally talented painter in the court of Akbar. The book provides remarkable insights into the Mughal world — a world where one’s identity is conferred ...Read More


Date of Publication: Friday, 6th December, 2002
Read the article on

Sarah Waters’s third book, Fingersmith, tells the story of a pair of seventeen year-old girls. But it is hardly a book for adolescents, for both its theme and treatment are extremely adult. The beginning of the novel has resonances of Oliver Twist. Susan Trinder, the central character, is an orphan brought ...Read More

7196 visits